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San Francisco 19, Us 15, Cohen 5, Dr. Campbell 4, Lord 4, Connecticut 3, Dr. Joe Marshall 3, Lee 3, United States 3, Bryant 2, Feinstein 2, Newtown 2, Dr. Andrei Campbell 1, Howard Jordan 1, Malia Cohen 1, Suhr 1, Heaven 1, Ucsf 1, First City 1, Andrei Campbell 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    February 1, 2013
    3:00 - 3:30pm PST  

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of our police chief, our health department, and certainly being led by supervisor cohen whose district has experienced an inordinate amount of violence throughout this year. we talk about it all the time. what can we do? for one, the ammunition that has been designed especially by law enforcement for military use has no reason to be in our homes and on our streets. and, so, we are introducing legislation focused on what has been labeled to be the hollow point bullets, but there are other types of bullets that are designed for more massive destruction of the human body that should only be in the hands of law enforcement and the military, and not in the civilian hands at all. and we want to ban them from possession in our city of san francisco. so, we're introducing
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legislation aimed at that kind of ballistics ammunition and banning them from possession in our city. the second piece of legislation is we believe that any person who purchases more than 500 rounds of any type of ammunition, notice should go to our police chief so that we have time to investigate as to reasons why that purchase should be made and understand who is making it. so, we are introducing a second piece of legislation about notification to our police chief of any of that kind of high level of purchase. these are at least two things that we are introducing today. there are potentially more to come, but we wanted to begin by taking action on this. and i stand here in front of you with a full display of some of the armory that was collected, turned in by people with the incentive of providing
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them with some remuneration of these weapons that were in their homes or other types of possession of this. and, of course, some of the ammunition that we will let you see that is not just body piercing, but designed to even be even more destructive. that's the reason why i have dr. campbell here. there have been many occasions, doctor, that i've been very thankful for you and your expert way of treating our patients whether firefighters or police officers are injured. but he has seen more than he should ever see of young -- youth who are victims of these bullets and the guns that we are talking about today. and he wants to explain the human side of this with our public health department officials. but i'd like to have further testimony by supervisor cohen of her experience and her
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leadership in helping me establish this. i will want to again put it in context that our city wants to intervene at an earlier stage. we want to do predictive policing. we want to support efforts throughout our community to organize them better so that we can prevent violence. this was at the heart of our work, introducing more support for our domestic violence advocates as well that we did just a few weeks ago. that with the heightened awareness of guns and the kinds of things that happen nationally, this is consistent with what we're willing to do. so, let me introduce at this time a good partner and the one that will be introducing this at the board, supervisor malia cohen. >> thank you. thank you, mr. mayor, for your leadership. and chief, thank you for your continuing efforts to be a tremendous advocate and partner. and our collective effort to address gun violence in our
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city. as the mayor mentioned, the tragic event that occurred at sandy hook elementary school last week was truly horrifying. and painful for all of us to sit back and witness. but i'm here today not to speak of last week's events in connecticut, but i'm here today because of the phone calls that i regularly get from many of the police officers that are here in this room today in the middle of the night. department officers informing me and alerting me of the violent shootings that are happening right here in our own neighborhood. i'm here today because i have personally visited too many families as they grieve the loss of loved ones, largely due to gun violence. i'm here today because of the time that i've spent at general hospital consoling innocent victims of gun violence, some as young as five years old. i'm here because we have to do more and use every legislative and executive power that are available to us to continue to address the causes as well as
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the impacts of senseless gun violence occurring in our neighborhoods. now, what we know is that many of the shootings that are occurring are increasingly involving young adults under the age of 25 years old. they are often related to disputes over turf and status and they're fueled by the fact that it's easy to obtain -- too easy to obtain and possess military style assault weapons and hollow point ammunition. as you will hear today from dr. campbell, thea hollow type ammunition especially [speaker not understood] to victims because the ammunition is designed to expand and shred an individual's internal organs upon impact, making it nearly impossible for a medical professional to repair and save lives. last week i had the pleasure of joining the police department as well as our community partner the omega boys club headed by dr. joe marshall and one of the most successful gun buy back programs.
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we collected approximately 2 96 guns off the street, 300 we were able to get guns off of out of hands of folks. not just in the southeast neighborhood, but all across san francisco. and i think we have a collective understanding that there is a growing awareness on the part of san franciscans about the need to do more to address gun violence and to believe -- and i believe that there is a desire for us as elected officials to take greater steps in implementing institutional solutions to these issues. * these weapons and this ammunition over here to my right don't belong in the hands of san francisco and online suppliers, online suppliers have an obligation to disclose to law enforcement officers information about residents buying large amounts of this lethal ammunition. i just want to say thank you for being here. i look forward to introducing this legislation. as soon as we hit the ground running in january.
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i appreciate your support, mr. mayor, and i look forward to continuing to working together. thank you. * >> thank you, supervisor. chief has been a great partner in not only law enforcement, with ideas of what else we could do. * chief sur i'm going to ask the chief to come up and talk about why we need to ban this ammunition, what it takes to create a system where we have reporting of individuals or entities that might want to buy 500 rounds of ammunition, and why it's important that that get reported. in addition to the very successful gun buy back that supervisor cohen had mentioned, there's also other things that we are doing as well. i have instructed chief sur to make sure we introduce to the new cadets in the police academy as well as retrain every officer in our police department on school safety
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tactics in light of the sandy hook elementary school disaster. and he's going to do that. it's already begun. the curriculum is being designed for that. that's as important, making sure that we work in concert with our school district to make sure every campus is safe. that means school safety tactics have always been around, gets a refreshed training by everyone. chief suhr. >> thank you, mr. mayor. i want to start off by reassuring everybody that what you saw play out on television, however unimaginable it was, that the heroism and the courage of the teachers at that school and the actions of the officers to respond directly in was a product of training after the columbine incident in colorado. across this country, all law enforcement agencies have been trained not to wait when there is an active shooter, but to go in immediately. and you actually saw that play out on television. and i think that for them doing
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that coupled with the fact that the teachers did as they were trained, and secured in place versus evacuating those kids into the hallways, had what is a horrific tragedy as far as it went, being far less than it might have been as a result of that training. as the mayor said here in san francisco, we have also trained to that standard. and as we're going through a high right now where we'll pick up a thousand police officers over the next six years, they, too, will be trained to that standard. * hire we've developed a crisis management handbook that's online and the link has been sent to every school in san francisco so that they can refresh their training on secure in place. there is a time to evacuate and then there's a time to stay put, wait as it was said in the media, to wait for the good guys. so, they did that in sandy hook and it saved lives. we will do that exact same thing should that event happen at any point in san francisco, and we're going to train so
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that that's the case for as long into the future as we can see to keep our kids safe. i, like supervisor cohen, want to applaud the mayor's leadership on this, to identify the most lethal ammunition, and to have allow the citizens to allow the police department to maintain the database. being the first city in the country to make that ammunition illegal as you will hear later, dr. campbell from probably the best trauma ward in the country will tell you what that ammunition does to people when they are hit by it. and then, again, to ask for a reporting on people that purchase as much or more as 500 rounds of ammunition so we cannot only track those people that are buying ammunition, but frequency of purchase as you can stockpile that ammunition. it is not going to be the -- any sort of suspension of the constitution. this is just smart, thoughtful
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community coming together with law enforcement so we know what people are doing and a simple question can be asked and if it's for target practice, that's fine as long as it's not the most lethal ammunition. the leadership in this country, you know, we've been divided for a while over small ideas and now we're coming together unfortunately after this tragedy over a big idea. and that's gun control. can't tell you how much the major city police chiefs of this country support the mayor. senator feinstein, congress, state senators, and mayors like mayor lee that we're fortunate to have, on gun control. senator feinstein will re-submit the assault weapons ban which bans 100 specific assault rifles, including the weapon used in sandy hook and high-capacity magazines of 10 rounds or more. there's other things that we as major city chiefs would like to see happen, such as the banning
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of internet ammo sales. we'd like to see in-person transactions. the record of sales and licensing of ammo vendors, and other things i can talk to you about off line. we are doing everything we can to make san francisco a safer place and reduce violent crime. the mayor spoke of ipo, which he introduced at the very beginning of august. and for the first august in memory and maybe even on record, we suffered zero homicides in that month. unfortunately one homicide in the city is too many. we've had 67 this year to date, which is up over the last couple years, record low. still the best we've had in 10 years absent those record lows. gun violence is down 4% in san francisco. largely because of community partnership. things like our gun tip line which i'll give you, 575-4444 and things like the gun buy
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back program. if you don't think that one of these guns or any of the other 2 96 * guns that were recovered here of the 300 guns that chief howard jordan and youth uprising were able to get over there weren't going to fall into the hands of somebody that might use them, you're betting against the odds. the shooter in newtown, connecticut, got those guns from his home, legally purchased firearms. we took 2 96 guns off the street here thankful to dr. joe marshall and omega boys club. over 150 handguns, almost 150 rifles and shotguns, these are not what people keep saying aren't going to make a difference. this is absolutely making a difference. and i would say to the nra or anybody that says, hey, this isn't the problem, if it's not the problem, it will make a difference, it should make a difference banning them. let's err on the side of caution, keep the kids safe. thank you.
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>> let me also echo again my appreciation for commissioner dr. joe marshall because omega boys club has been a great partner. they are part of our effort to organize commutes, to intervene as early as we can, and i totally agree with the chief that these particular guns, if you look at them up front and close, you'll see they really shouldn't be in anybody's homes. they're designed to kill folks. many of them military style. i think to bring home the real story here is dr. andrei campbell of our san francisco general hospital, and also on staff at ucsf. he is at the forefront of world class trauma center that we have. and if you go day to day, and certainly with the 67 homicides that we have with the numbers of bodies that were showing up and people have shown up, many of which he saved, many of
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which he couldn't save that were victims of bullets and violence and gun violence in our city, you know that that's another good reason as to why we need to do as much prevention as we can. dr. campbell. >> good afternoon, mayor lee, supervisor cohen, chief suhr, members of the press. my name is dr. andrei campbell and i've worked at san francisco general hospital for the past 19 years as a trauma surgeon. before i came to san francisco i worked in new york. i have 24 years of experience of caring for victims in two major cities in our great country. this week all of us have watched with horror the events in newtown, connecticut, with great sadness as we learned the devastation that one person brought on that quiet community. i've seen the devastation that guns have visited on victims of crime. my heart goes out to all the victims and their families as they struggle to understand what has happened over the last
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week. san francisco general hospital is the only trauma center in the city and county of san francisco and in the u.s. it is, in fact, i think, the best trauma center in the united states. we stand ready 24/7 to care for any injured patient in the city and county of san francisco. we also at general hospital are caring for uninsured and underinsured people who come in after injured. we also represent -- i also represent thousands of dedicated physicians, surgeons, nurses, administration and therapists who care for the hundreds of thousands of patients who come to our hospital. i have dedicated my life to providing care for injured patients in our community. it is truly a team effort to provide care for the victims of vie lertctionv crime. we rely heavily on our many trained professionals 20 help us do our work each day. after persons injured due to shooting after the scene, people go there, public firefighters and servants.
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the trauma surgeons, emergency physicians anesthesiologists, orthopedic surgeons, nurses, therapists and many, many others who come to help us work on the patient. and we do this for every single person who is injured. we bring all the resources there. we can to make sure we can save as many people as we can each day. the reality and sadness is we may save many, but we can't save everyone. over the years i have seen massive increase in the fire power witnesses before you today. these guns are more powerful and destruction are profound. from ak-47s, other assault-style weapons, hand gun, extended clips, hollow point bullets, black talon weapons, bullets and other things like that, i've seen them and the work that -- the problems they cause each day. the larger weapons create absolute devastation in the victims. when they strike a victim, it's like a bomb going off. i struggle with all the
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dedicated team members to save their lives as it's real a a battle against life and death. sometimes they have overwhelming mortal wounds and i cannot save them. we save a lot, but we can't save everyone. they have massive chest, abdominal, leg, head wounds that become -- that are the consequences of these large weapons in froth of you. -- front of you. they are the victims, but their families that are also injured when or have problems after the shooting. when a victim dies it leaves a hole in the family. they can't ever forget the devastated mothers, father's, sisters, brothers, that are struggling with loss. the way of a mother is unique sound as she screams, my baby is dead, my baby is dead. * wail it is a terrible sound, i wish i would have to never hear it again. part of the process of making sure these lethal weapons are off the street. if we save the patient, they
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have to deal with many operations, icu care, post tau matt he -- posttraumatic stress. head injuries, disfiguring operations and long-term care and many, many other serious problems. we cannot forget the physical scars, but there's also emotional scars after they are injured. at san francisco general hospital a number of gunshot wounds has declined in recent years. in 2007 we cared for 381 shooting victims in our emergency department. 2011, the last year we have data on, that number is now 182 shooting victims. while this is a substantial drop, i submit to you that one is too many. these numbers represent the patients who are transported to the hospital, not the victims who died at the scene or do not come in for care. many people are killed from homicides, but suicide taking one's life with weapons is much
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more common in the united states. it is a silent killer since more than twice as many people die of suicide than homicide historically in the united states. there is an hep dim i can of violent crime committed with guns and is a serious public health problem that we must confront head on. * it is incidents like this past week bring these terrible crimes out in the public, but the reality is people are killed every day in this country with weapons that permanently change the lives of the families that they are with. in conclusion, i would like to thank the mayor for inviting me out to stand with supervisor cohen, police chief sur, to support sensible gun control. the trauma center stands ready to care for victims. any initiative that can reduce guns in my opinion will make the streets and the cities and counties -- cities like san francisco a much safer place to live. i thank you for your time this morning.
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>> thank you, doctor. today we're focused on ammunition and immediate interruption in the behavior that law enforcement advises us and sees every day that leads to more violence. in the weeks and months to come, the board and the mayor's office will be introducing both more ideas and legislation and resolutions to support federal and state efforts in the same direction. at the same time, we'll also be introducing through our budget support for an ongoing organizing in our community to support nonlaw enforcement efforts to reduce violence, whether it's education, social services, housing, none of that escapes us as to their link in efforts to reduce violence in our society. with that i want to thank everybody for coming today. and i would ask everyone in san francisco, if not the whole
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region and the state, to please join us in a national moment of silence that will occur tomorrow morning east coast time, it will be 9:30 a.m., and here in san francisco it will be 6:30 a.m. for a national moment of silence to remember all the victims in sandy hook. of course, at the same time, remember all the victims at our own locally it victims of gun violence. and before and after this moment of silence we will be active doing the things we need to do to reduce violence in our city. thank you.
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>> good afternoon ladies and gentlemen. for those that haven't please take your seats. again we so appreciate you all gathering on today's peace sunday. we appreciate you taking the time. we are certainly grateful for the special guest which we will come to momentarily. let me dispense with some of the acknowledgments on the on set and grateful to our mayor and our city officials who are here, chief wendy steel, and those from juvenile probation, commanders and briefs and we appreciate each of the city leaders being with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the
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church works with the rainbow coalition. >> good afternoon. what a pleasure it is to be here and the patron saint of this great city work in the words of a prayer. lord, make me an instrument of your peace. as we look the things we realize the up tick of vlz is real and as we unified from all denominations and practices and speak simply. peace on earth and may this season be about peace. i commend mayor lee and work with him and resource ourselves and connect ourselves those in the city that believe our city can be a city of peace. as part of
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the rainbow coalition it's an honor to hold this today and jesse jackson and against violence prevention and that we can represent that well in the season of peace and we bring forward carolyn scott for our opening prayer of this peace hour. >> thank you reverend bryant. bow your heart with me. a discussion on the importance of interface based leadership on the city's violence prevention initiative predict and organize for a safer san francisco is where we're opening up in prayer. iicizea and "it shall
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come to pass before they call i will answer and yet while they are speaking i will "hear". mayor lee you spoke briefly at the interfaith breakfast and called out for help how do we get to our youth who are disenfranchised and not connected. you asked that you dependd and asked for the help of clergy and the religious community. you said you asked because you and the civic leaders and the departments cannot do it alone. we are here to pray for that reason. you went on to say our future leaders inherit what we do and all that we fail to do. at this breakfast the response from mrs. rita simel of the san francisco interfaith council was "mr. mayor, we will help". for
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the sake of the health and safety and peace of this city, the only city in this nation named after a saint we come to pray this day and we pray oh god that you would disturb us lord when we are too well pleased with ourselves and we dreamed too little when we arrived safely, because we sailed too close to the shore. disturb us lord with the abundance of things we possess we have lost our thirst for the waters of life falling in love with l we have ceased to dream of eternity and in our efforts to build a new earth we have allowed our vision of the new heaven to dim. disturb us lord to go more boldly and venture on wider seas where storms will show your mastery where losing sight of land we will find the stars.
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we ask you to push back oh god the horizons of our open and into the future courage strength and things that we get in love. god we pray you will be our eyes and help us to be wise in times and honest enough to say we don't know. let this be our prayer as we go on way. let us to a place. guide us with your grace to a place where we will be safe oh god. father we pray and push back works of destruction and the spirits of destruction and ask that you do lead us to a place and guide us with your grace and gave us faith so we're safe in our homes, our schools and work place as we seek measures and ways for working towards peace for this fine
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city as we present ourselves as clergy and fault in this world. amen. >> amen. >> amen. thank you reverend scott. as pastor bryant said we are grateful for the leadership of our city's mayor and upon the uptick of violence had a set of strategies to bring together all segments and sections of our community and leadership certainly and nonprofit, residents and as well as clergy so we're grateful for his leadership so it's my pleasure. will you please welcome our mayor ed lee. >> thank you very much for coming today and certainly my deep gratitude for reverend jackson for making his very